Colon Cancer

 

Colorectal (Colon) cancer is the third most common type of cancer. Globally more than 1 million people are diagnosed with colon cancer every year, resulting in about 715,000 deaths as of 2010. It is the second most common cause of cancer in women and the third most common in men and is the fourth most common cause of cancer mortalities after lung, stomach and liver cancer.

Cancers of the colon and rectum start when the process of the normal replacement of lining cells goes awry. Symptoms of colorectal cancer typically include rectal bleeding and anemia, which are sometimes associated with weight loss, worsening constipation, blood in the stool, nausea and vomiting. 

Most of the colon cancer occurs in people with little or no genetic risk. Other risk factors include older age, male gender, high intake of fat, alcohol or red meat, obesity, smoking and lack of physical exercise. 

Cancers that are confined within the wall of the colon may be cured with surgery. However, cancer that has spread widely around the body is usually not curable and management then focuses on extending the person's life via chemotherapy. Most deaths due to colon cancer are associated with metastatic disease.

 

 

Colon Cancer